Are you ready for your next show?

As things slowly start to open back up, we want to make sure you are fully prepared and equipped to get on the road again! We followed https://horserookie.com/packing-horse-trailering-checklist/ and put together a printer-friendly checklist for you to have. Click the link below!

       Show checklist printable PDF           


 

 

 

What should you know about Dormosedan Gel?

What is Dormosedan Gel?

Dormosedan or “dorm gel” is an oral sedative that is administered under your horse’s tongue as it is not meant to be swallowed by the horse. The gel should not be used in addition to any other sedatives.

How long will it last?

The gel needs about 40 minutes to take effect and the sedation will last for about 90-180 minutes.

What is dorm gel generally used for?

Dorm gel is usually used to sedate for the farrier, clipping, or if they get nervous for the veterinarian.

What type of horse should this sedative be used on?

The gel is perfectly fine to use on any healthy horse or pony as long as they are not running a fever. You should not use Dormosedan Gel on any horse with cardiovascular disease, severe debilitation, liver or kidney disease, stress from extreme heat, cold, or in high altitude.

Can the gel cause harm to humans?

Yes, always wear impermeable gloves while administering Dorm Gel and keep out of reach of children. Dorm Gel can be absorbed following exposure to the skin, eyes or mouth and can cause irritation. Accidental administration to humans can cause adverse reactions, such as sedation, hypotension, and bradycardia. Seek medical attention immediately.

Are there any adverse reactions that a horse can have to this gel?

Research shows that after testing over 200 horses there were minimal adverse reactions, such as sweating, urination, salivation, flatulence, slow heart rate, and sheath dropping. This reaction was observed in less than 2% of the horses tested.

 

Written by Molly Mills, DVM

The Who, What, and When of an MRI

 

What is an MRI?

MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. To explain how it works can be difficult, but I will try to break it down into its simplest form. The MRI uses magnetic fields and computer-generated radiofrequency waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues in your body. The magnetic field temporarily realigns water molecules in your body. Radiofrequency waves cause these aligned atoms to produce faint signals, which are used to create cross-sectional MRI images — like slices in a loaf of bread. The “slice” can occur in three different planes ( i.e. front to back- frontal, side to side – sagittal,  cross-sectional – transverse)

 

What can an MRI show the vet and why is it helpful?

An MRI in the horse offers a couple of big advantages to other forms of imaging. First of all, an MRI can evaluate both bone and soft tissue structures. Whereas radiology or x-rays are primarily for bone, an ultrasound is primarily for soft tissue, and nuclear medicine/bone scan is primarily for bone.  Secondly, an MRI can image the structures of the foot extremely well, which is a common source of pain and lameness in the horse. We can generate x-rays for the bones of the foot adequately, but we cannot visualize the soft tissue structures of the foot very well because of the hoof wall, but the MRI allows us to do so. Thirdly, an MRI and CT are considered 3-dimensional imaging forms, while radiographs, ultrasounds, and nuclear medicine are only 2- dimensional imaging.  Three-dimensional imaging gives us a much greater detail of the location and status of normal and diseased tissues.

 

Who is a good candidate for an MRI?

While there are various reasons a horse may be referred for MRI, the most common reason is lameness. The lameness could range from a low grade intermittent to persistent lameness or acute one.  At BREC we can perform MRI studies from the carpus and hock down to the foot. Our magnet (Esoate – O Scan) was originally designed to do human extremities (i.e. hands, feet legs, and arms). We have a very small radiofrequency coil which allows for a lot less signal “noise” and creates a better image quality. Unfortunately, because we have a small radiofrequency coil, we cannot perform studies on draft horses or horses with potentially very, very large feet.

 

When would an MRI be something an owner should consider doing? 

 

There are many reasons for your horse to get an MRI, aside from the amount of time and money that can be lost from an inaccurate diagnosis, inappropriate treatments, and don’t forget about lost training time! One of the biggest reasons to get an MRI is it offers the most definitive diagnosis which will then allow you and your veterinarian to formulate a comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation plan. Furthermore, a follow-up MRI can also be used to assess healing and response to therapy.

 

What should be done before an MRI can be scheduled?

 

Keep in mind that we cannot MRI a whole body or for that matter a whole leg. With the MRI we have roughly a 5-6 inch “field of view” or study.  So, it is crucial to have a lameness examination performed and nerve and or joint blocks to localize the region of lameness. This will determine which fields of view should undergo an MRI.  This also helps interpret the significance of the MRI findings.

 

By Dr. Steven S Trostle DVM, MS, DACVS, DACVSMR

VACCINATIONS FOR ADULT HORSES

 

VACCINATIONS FOR ADULT HORSES

 

**ALL VACCINATION PROGRAMS SHOULD BE DEVELOPED IN CONSULTATION WITH A LICENSED VETERINARIAN**

 

 

DISEASE

Broodmares Other Adult Horses

(> 1 year of age)

 

previously vaccinated against the disease indicated

Other Adult Horses

(> 1 year of age)

unvaccinated or

lacking vaccination history

 

COMMENTS

 

Tetanus

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern / Western Equine Encephalo- myelitis (EEE/WEE)

 

Previously vaccinated:

Annual, 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum

 

Previously unvaccinated or having unknown vaccination history:

2-dose series

2nd dose 4-6 weeks after 1st dose. Revaccinate 4-6 weeks pre-partum

 

 

Previously vaccinated:

Annual, 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum

 

Previously unvaccinated or having unknown vaccination history:

2-dose series

2nd dose 4 weeks after 1st dose. Revaccinate 4-6 weeks pre- partum.

 

Annual

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual – spring, prior to onset of vector season.

 

2-dose series

2nd dose 4 – 6 weeks after 1st dose. Annual revaccination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2-dose series

2nd dose 4 – 6 weeks after 1st dose.

 

Revaccinate prior to the onset of the next vector season.

 

Booster at time of penetrating injury or prior to surgery if last dose was

administered over 6 months previously.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consider 6-month revaccination interval for:

 

*  In high risk situations such as an early onset of seasonal disease

 

*  Increase incidence in a geographic area

 

*  Foals of unvaccinated mares

 

Practitioner in consultation with manufacturer, may consider starting earlier vaccination or using a product more frequently.

 

CORE VACCINATIONS protect against diseases that are endemic to a region, are virulent/highly contagious, pose a risk of severe disease, those having potential public health significance, and/or are required by law. Core vaccines have clearly demonstrable efficacy and safety, with a high enough level of patient benefit and low enough level of risk to justify their use in all equids.

 

 

West Nile Virus (WNV)

 

Previously vaccinated: Annual, 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum

 

Unvaccinated or lacking vaccination history:

It is preferable to vaccinate naïve mares when open.

 

In areas of high risk, initiate primary series as described for unvaccinated, adult horses.

 

Annual – spring, prior to onset of vector season

 

3-dose series:

1st dose at 4 – 6 months of age

2nd dose 4 – 6 weeks after the 1st dose

3rd dose at 10 – 12 months of age Annual Revaccination

 

Rabies

 

Annual, 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum OR

Prior to breeding*

 

Annual

 

Single dose

Annual revaccination

 

*Due to the relatively long duration of immunity, this vaccine may be given

post-foaling but prior to breeding and thus reduce the number of vaccines given to a mare pre-partum.

 

RISK-BASED VACCINATIONS can be found on the following pages

 

RISK-BASED VACCINES are selected for use based on risk assessment** performed by, or in consultation with, a licensed veterinarian.   Use of these vaccines may vary between individuals, populations, and/or geographic regions.

Note: Vaccines are listed in this table in alphabetical order, not in order of priority for use.

 

**Refer to “Principles of Vaccination” in main document for criteria used in performing risk assessment.

 

 

 

 

DISEASE

Broodmares  

Other Adult Horses

(> 1 year of age)

 

previously vaccinated against the disease indicated

 

Other Adult Horses

(> 1 year of age)

 

unvaccinated or

lacking vaccination history

 

COMMENTS

 

Anthrax

 

Not recommended during gestation

 

Annual

 

2-dose series

2nd dose 3-4 weeks after 1st dose. Annual revaccination.

 

Do not administer concurrently with antibiotics.

 

Use caution during storage, handling and administration. Consult a physician immediately if human exposure to vaccine occurs by accidental injection, ingestion, or otherwise through the conjunctiva or broken skin.

 

Botulism

 

Previously vaccinated:

Annual, 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum

 

Previously unvaccinated or having unknown vaccination history:

3-dose series

1st dose at 8 months gestation. 2nd dose 4 weeks after 1st dose 3rd dose 4 weeks after 2nd dose

 

Annual

 

3-dose series

2nd dose 4 weeks after 1st dose

3rd dose 4 weeks after 2nd dose Annual revaccination

 

 

Horses with history of natural exposure: A vaccination protocol should be initiated once antitoxin immunoglobulins are depleted.

 

 

 

 

Equine Herpesvirus (EHV)

 

 

 

3-dose series with product labeled for protection against EHV abortion

 

Give at 5, 7 and 9 months of gestation

 

It is recommended to also booster broodmares with a product labeled for protection against respiratory disease 4-6 weeks prepartum

 

 

 

Annual (see comments)

 

 

 

 

Inactivated vaccine: Dependent upon on manufacturer’s product recommendation, the vaccine may be a two or three dose series with a 3 to 4-week interval between doses.

 

Annual revaccination

 

 

 

 

Consider 6-month revaccination interval for:

 

1)       Horses less than 5 years of age

2)       Horses on breeding farms or in contact with pregnant mares

3)       Performance or show horses at high risk

 

 

Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA)

 

Not recommended unless high risk.

 

Mares in foal should not be vaccinated until after foaling and not less than 3 weeks prior to breeding.

 

The manufacturer does not recommend use of this vaccine in pregnant mares, especially in the last two months of pregnancy.

 

Annual

 

·         Breeding stallions previously vaccinated against EVA: Annual booster every 12 months and not less than 3 to 4 weeks prior to breeding.

·         Breeding stallions, unvaccinated or having unknown vaccine history: All first-time vaccinated stallions should be isolated for 3 weeks following vaccination before being used for breeding.

·         Teaser Stallions: Vaccination against EVA is recommended on an annual basis.

 

Mares: Vaccinate when open

 

Single dose (See comments)

 

Prior to initial vaccination,  intact males and any horses potentially intended for export should undergo serologic testing and be confirmed negative for antibodies to EAV. Testing should be performed shortly prior to, or preferably at, the time of vaccination.

 

 

 

Influenza

 

 

Pregnant mares, previously vaccinated against influenza:

 

Inactivated vaccine: Annually with one dose administered 4 – 6 weeks pre- partum

 

Pregnant mares, unvaccinated or having unknown vaccine history:

 

Inactivated vaccine: Dependent upon on manufacturer’s product recommendation, the vaccine may be a two or three dose series with a 3 to 4- week interval between doses (IM), with the last dose administered 4-6 weeks pre-partum

 

 

Horses with ongoing risk of exposure: Semi-annual

Horses at low risk of exposure: Annual revaccination

.

 

 

Inactivated vaccine: Dependent upon on manufacturer’s product recommendation, the vaccine may be a two or three dose series with a 3 to 4-week interval between doses

 

Modified live vaccine: Administer a single dose (IN application).

 

Annual revaccination

 

 

Horses at increased risk of exposure may be revaccinated every 6 months. Some facilities and competitions may require vaccination within the previous 6 months to enter.

 

USEF Vaccination Rule https://www.usef.org/forms-  pubs/ANcxoLX1gNs/equine- vaccination-rule-gr845

 

Leptospirosis

 

Safe for use in pregnant mares

 

Previously unvaccinated or having unknown vaccination history:

2 Initial doses 3-4 weeks apart

 

Previously vaccinated:

Annual revaccination

 

Annual

 

2 initial doses 3-4 weeks apart Annual revaccination

 

Field safety testing has demonstrated this product is safe for use in pregnant mares

 

Potomac Horse Fever (PHF)

 

Previously vaccinated:

Semi-annual, with one dose given 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum

 

Previously unvaccinated or having unknown vaccination history:

2-dose series

1st dose 7-9 weeks pre-partum

2nd dose 4-6 weeks pre-partum

 

Semi-annual to annual

 

2-dose series

2nd dose 3-4 weeks after 1st dose Semi-annual or annual booster

 

A revaccination interval of 3 – 4 months may be considered in endemic areas when disease risk is high.

 

 

 

Rotavirus

 

3-dose series

1st dose at 8 months gestation. 2nd and 3rd doses at 4-week intervals thereafter

 

Not applicable

 

Not applicable

 

Snake Bite

 

Please see guidelines for additional information

 

Please see guidelines for additional information

 

Please see guidelines for additional information

 

Strangles

Streptococcus equi

 

Previously vaccinated:

 

Killed vaccine containing M-protein):

 

Semi-annual with one dose given 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum

 

Previously unvaccinated or having unknown vaccination history:

 

Killed vaccine containing M- protein):

3-dose series

2nd dose 2 – 4 weeks after 1st dose

3rd dose 4 – 6 weeks pre-partum

 

Semi-annual to annual

 

Killed vaccine containing M-protein:

2-3 dose series

2nd dose 2 – 4 weeks after 1st dose 3rd dose (where recommended by manufacturer) 2 – 4 weeks after 2nd dose

Revaccinate semi-annually

 

Modified live vaccine:

2-dose series administered intranasally 2nd dose 3 weeks after 1st dose Revaccinate semi-annually to annually

 

Vaccination is not recommended as a strategy in outbreak mitigation.

 

Vaccinations for Adult Horses were developed by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Infectious Disease Committee. These guidelines and charts were reviewed and updated by the committee & Vaccination Guidelines Subcommittee and approved by the Board of Directors in 2020.

 

Please note that updates to these guidelines and charts may occur online at anytime and should always be referenced there for the most current version at www.aaep.org.

Blue Ridge Equine Clinic Deworming Protocol

 

                                                                               Blue Ridge Equine Clinic Deworming Protocol

 

Adult LOW Shedder Schedule

**to be used for adult equids over the age of 1 year**

 

  

 

 

SPRING

 

    FALL

   FECAL TEST: Yes No
 

   DEWORMER TO USE:

Moxidectin (Ivermectin for miniature horses) Ivermectin/praziquantel

  

 

Adult HIGH Shedder Schedule

**to be used for adult equids over the age of 1 year**

 

 

 

 

 

 

  MARCH

 

 

 

      MAY

 

 

 

      JULY

 

 

 

  OCTOBER

 

 

 

  JANUARY

 

 

  FECAL TEST:

 

  Yes

 

  No

 

  No

 

  Yes

 

  No

 

  DEWORMER TO USE:

Moxidectin (ivermectin for minis) Pyrantel (double dose) Ivermectin with Praziquantel Moxidectin (ivermectin for minis) Ivermectin

    

In case of emergency!

Are you traveling for the holidays and leaving your horses in someone else’s care? BREC has put together an “In case of an emergency” care sheet that will provide your barn caretaker with all the essential information needed in case anything should happen while you are away! The first page includes all emergency contacts and insurance information, while the second page allows you to leave specific feeding and care instructions for each individual horse. We hope you have a happy holiday and please remember we are available 24/7 if you need us!

In Case of an Emergency PDF

What Can We Do To Help Unwanted Horses?

That was the question the American Association of Equine Practitioners and the American Horse Council considered jointly. The Unwanted Horse Coalition was formed to address the this problem and invites you to become involved. As horse lovers, we share responsibility for this issue.

Taking A Closer Look: How Blood Tests Can Add To Your Horse’s Exam

There are times when your veterinarian might advise running some “bloodwork” on your horse, but why? What information is gained, and how might it help? The answer depends on the specific tests run. Obviously, there are blood tests to detect the presence of specific viruses and bacteria that cause diseases, but what about the hematology and chemistry tests?

First, an explanation of what the tests are and what they reveal. The hematology tests analyze the components of the blood, which are the red blood cells, the white blood cells, and the total solids (proteins) in the blood.   Red blood cells carry oxygen to the tissues in the body, and too few red blood cells is called anemia. Red cell numbers can fall because of a lack of production if the bone marrow is being suppressed by inflammation or other illness, loss due to bleeding somewhere in the body, or inappropriate destruction, which can occur with a number of diseases. An increase in red cells is usually associated with dehydration, but rarely, horses with liver disease produce too many red cells. White blood cells are the soldiers of the immune system, and changes in the population of white cells can indicate inflammation. Depending on the change in the white cells, your veterinarian may also gain information about the severity and nature of the inflammation.

The biochemical analysis, or chemistry, is a panel of tests that reflect the function of different organ systems of the body, and can also indicate inflammation. Information is available on a standard chemistry test about the health of the liver, kidneys, muscles, and intestines.

There are a number of situations in which hematology and chemistry can be useful in managing a horse’s health care. The most obvious case is when a horse is showing signs of illness, such as fever, cough, weight loss, loss of appetite, change in manure, etc. The information gained from the blood work can point the veterinarian toward the cause of the disease, which will determine treatment, and also give vital information about the severity of the problem, which may change the approach to treatment (at home vs.in a clinic) or the expected outcome of treatment. Periodic blood tests during treatment help the veterinarian know how the horse is responding to treatment.

Sometimes, it is helpful to run bloodwork on healthy horses. The most common reason to run blood tests on healthy horses is to monitor the health of older horses. Just as we tend to develop problems as we age, horses may develop age related problems as they grow older. Running a hematology and chemistry yearly can help to catch liver, kidney, and sometimes endocrine problems early when intervention is most likely to be helpful. Another group of healthy horses in which routine blood work can be helpful is the population of horses that are maintained on medication long term. Any medication given over time can have systemic effects, and monitoring the health of the organs with simple blood tests can catch liver or kidney problems, gastrointestinal inflammation, or anemia early, before they make the horse sick. Including blood work into your horse’s yearly exam, especially if he is older than 15 years old or on “maintenance” medication or supplements, may help your veterinarian optimize his health and well-being.

Dr. Tracy Norman Attends Advanced Cardiology Course

Dr. Tracy Norman attended an advanced equine cardiology course in Las Vegas offered by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine that was only open to internal medicine and veterinary cardiology specialists. New research regarding the importance of heart rhythm disturbances  on performance and safety was presented, as well as advanced techniques in echocardiography (heart ultrasound) and cardiac diagnostics for horses with poor athletic performance. This course will help me to thoroughly diagnose heart murmurs, rhythm disturbances, and performance limitations, to formulate a prognosis for horses with heart problems, and aid owners and riders in making informed decisions about the safety and suitability of horses for different kinds of work.

Basic Equine First Aid Kit

Most horse owners have certain medications/supplies they won’t be caught without. Following is a suggested list to cover most needs until the veterinarian arrives. This would make a great gift for a new horse owner!

Equipment:
Stethoscope
Thermometer
Watch
Flash light
Bandage Scissors
Dose syringe
Spare halter and lead

Bandaging supplies:
Pack of gauze square (4X4’s)
Non stick pads
Stretch gauze rolls
Sheet cotton
Standing wraps and bandages
Vet wrap
Elastikon
Roll cotton

Medications:
One dose of banamine or buscopam-call 1st
Triple antibiotic or SSD ointment
Bute paste, powder or tabs
Epsom salt
Mastitis cream syringe
Eye wash
Desitin

Other supplies:
Surgical scrub: Nolvasan or similar
Saline spray
Gloves
Poultice

Hoof care:
Duct tape
Soaking boot such as a “Davis Blue Boot”
Items to pull a shoe: Rasp and Pull offs
Animalintex poultice pads