Archive | Equine Injuries

Five Steps to Prevent Tendon Injuries in your Horse

Tendon injuries can mean lengthy time off, stall rest, etc. for your horse, so all of us want to do everything possible to prevent them from occurring. Here are five steps on how to prevent them: 1. Buy a horse with the best conformation possible. We all realize that there is no perfectly conformed horse and there […]

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Ristocrat’s Return: Making the Most of Time off

There it was, the news that horse owners dread to hear: the young, beautiful, talented warmblood that she bred had a suspensory tear. All the momentum of his promising career in dressage seemed to have ground to a halt, and now a new goal loomed. Roberta Falk was determined to pursue the best course of treatment […]

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What’s Wrong With My Horse’s Eye?

Eye problems are more prevalent through the summer and fall. It is important to be aware that any eye problem should be considered serious and addressed in a timely manner. Certain eye conditions can progress quite rapidly (within 24 hours), becoming so serious that the horse will need to have the eye removed or will […]

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“Help, my horse stepped on a nail!”

As you can see from this x-ray, you never know where a nail goes from the outside! If you find a nail in your horse’s foot, this is an emergency. Please call your veterinarian immediately. We ask that you NOT remove the nail. This may seem crazy, but without taking radiographs with the nail in place, […]

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Equine 911: When do I really need to call the vet?

When horses are sick or injured, it can be difficult to know what problems need a veterinarian’s care on an emergency basis, and which can wait until morning or later. Some situations, such as major bleeding, thrashing colic, or a horse that is down and can’t get up, clearly require veterinary intervention, but others are […]

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Subcutaneous Emphysema Caused by a Skull Fracture

Recently my horse Mocha fractured a small bone in the sinus region of her face causing subcutaneous emphysema, which means gas or air is trapped beneath the layer of skin. It is not a hot or hard swelling; it feels like it crackles and is crunchy to the touch, a sensation known as crepitus. I […]

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